The Pope calls for end to Putin’s ‘senseless’ conflict in Ukraine in Christmas Day message [VIDEO]


Pope Francis has called for an end to Putin’s “senseless” conflict in Ukraine in his Christmas Day message to the world.

The head of the Catholic Church addressed thousands of people gathered in St. Peter’s Square, some of them holding Ukrainian flags, before giving the ‘Urbi et Orbi’ blessing.

The call for peace is traditionally the focus of the Pope’s message at Christmas, the holiday marking the birth of Christ, delivered from the central balcony of St. Peter’s Basilica and broadcast live around the world.

The 86-year-old first addressed “our Ukrainian brothers and sisters who are living this Christmas in the dark and cold” and recalled “with sadness” that “the icy wind of war continues to hit humanity”.

Pope Francis' conflict with Putin in Ukraine

Pope Francis has called for an end to Putin’s “senseless” conflict in Ukraine in his Christmas Day message to the world.

He said: “May the Lord inspire us to offer specific gestures of solidarity to help all those who are suffering, and may he enlighten the will of those who have the power to silence the thunder of arms and to end this senseless war immediately. !’

“Tragically, we prefer to heed other advice, dictated by global mindsets.

“Our time is suffering from a serious famine of peace in other regions and in other theaters of this third world war.”

The Pope mentioned many countries that are in difficulties this Christmas, due to conflict or other crisis, from Afghanistan to Yemen, Syria, Myanmar, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Lebanon and Haiti.

For the first time, he also called for “reconciliation” in Iran, which has been rocked by women-led protests for the past three months.

The Pope has called for peace in Ukraine since Russia invaded its neighbor in February, condemning war but trying to maintain a delicate dialogue with Moscow.

However, they have been criticized for not being more explicit in blaming Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The Pope has called for peace in Ukraine since Russia invaded its neighbor in February, condemning the war but trying to maintain a delicate dialogue with Moscow (Photo: Buildings on fire in Bakhmut, Ukraine, due to Russian bombing on December 23)

The Pope has called for peace in Ukraine since Russia invaded its neighbor in February, condemning the war but trying to maintain a delicate dialogue with Moscow (Pictured: Buildings on fire in Bakhmut, Ukraine, following Russian bombings on December 23)

In a magazine interview published last month, the Argentine pontiff denounced the brutality of Russian troops in Ukraine, prompting a formal protest from Moscow.

Even today, the Pope asked those celebrating Christmas to remember “those who go hungry every day while large amounts of food are wasted and resources are spent on weapons”.

“The war in Ukraine has further aggravated this situation, putting whole peoples at risk of starvation, especially in Afghanistan and the countries of the Horn of Africa,” he said.

“We know that every war causes hunger and exploits food as a weapon, preventing its distribution to people who are already suffering.

“On this day, let’s learn from the Prince of Peace (Christ) and, starting with those who have political responsibilities, let’s commit to making food only a tool for peace.”

The Pope led the traditional Christmas Eve Mass in St Peter’s Basilica yesterday, using a wheelchair as he continues to struggle with knee pain.

The Pope led the traditional Christmas Eve Mass in St Peter's Basilica yesterday, using a wheelchair as he continues to battle knee pain.

The Pope led the traditional Christmas Eve Mass in St Peter’s Basilica yesterday, using a wheelchair as he continues to battle knee pain.

He prayed “for the children who have been swallowed up by war, poverty and injustice” and lamented that “men who are hungry for power and money are devouring their loved ones, their brothers”.

He called on people to “put aside the warmth of worldliness” and “rediscover the meaning of Christmas” in the face of “consumerism”, in favor of the Church that is at the service of the poor.

The Vatican drew 70,000 people on Sunday, with 7,000 attending the Saturday evening Mass, with more watching the service on outdoor screens.

“It’s very inspiring to be here with all these people,” said Victoria Machado, who traveled from Mexico to the Vatican with her family.

“We are happy and excited to see the Pope, even though he is away, and to feel that connection with each other,” added the 19-year-old.

Julie, 50, who runs a business in France, said the pope was “a very humble man, I think he is able to offer a message of peace and try to bring people together and ease tensions.”

Leave a Comment